Workshops - Summer 2018

This summer Hambidge presents a variety of workshops in fiber arts, ceramics and the culinary arts, presented by exceptionally talented artists. Pick your favorites, register, and come enjoy the Georgia mountains while learning new ways to be creative!

SCHEDULE
June 9 –  FREE Ceramic Stone Totem Workshop with Rachel K. Garceau at the Rabun County Library
June 16One-Day Garment Workshop with Natalie Chanin
June 23Elemental Pie with Lisa Donovan and Angie Mosier
June 30FREE T-shirt Workshop with Natalie Chanin at the Rabun County Library
July 28 & 29Pinch Pot Portraits with Mike Lalone
August 4 & 5Inside Out & Upside Down: Mold-Making with Rachel K. Garceau
September 8 & 9Natural Fabric Dyeing with Coulter Fussell

Continue reading below for details about each workshop, plus online registration. Call Hambidge at 706-746-7324 with questions.

Individuals are responsible for their own accommodations. Here is a link to a list of accommodations that are close to the Hambidge Center. Two rooms in the Rock House are available to Hambidge Fellows for a nightly fee of $40 on a first come, first served, basis (2 night minimum). Contact Christine at 706-746-7324 to reserve.

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JUNE 9 - Ceramic Stone Totem Workshop with Rachel K. Garceau
at the Rabun County Library in Clayton, Georgia
for Rabun County Residents only

Create your own clay sculpture for home, desk, garden or porch. In this hands-on clay workshop for ages 8 to 80, you can choose and assemble a ceramic stone totem from existing pieces, or you can mold your own. For the top, you can sculpt a symbol of your favorite animal. All the pieces combine to make a serene, nature-based sculpture. The sculptures will be fired and returned to the library for you to pick up on the following Saturday. This workshop is presented in collaboration with the Hambidge Center and the Rabun County Library, and is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Rachel K. Garceau is a studio artist living and working in the Atlanta, GA area, and has been recognized as a 2015 Emerging Artist by the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts and one of 2017’s Women to Watch by the Georgia Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She utilizes slip-cast porcelain forms to construct site-responsive installations. Her work is often born from a curiosity about an object or a place and a desire to come to a deeper understanding of it. Rachel received a BA in Fine Arts from Franklin Pierce College in 2003 and went on to pursue her education through studio assistantships, workshops, and residencies. In 2013, Rachel completed the two-year Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts (NC). She has received residencies at Vendsyssel Kuntsmuseum (DK), Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts (TN), Haystack Mountain School of Crafts (ME) and the Hambidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences (GA). Her work has been shown at GreenHill Center for NC Art (NC), Lillstreet Gallery (IL), and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia (GA), and has been published in Studio Potter, Ceramics Monthly, and NCECA Journal, and also appears in CAST: Art and Objects Made Using Humanity’s Most Transformational Process.

Date:
June 9, 10am-noon

Experience level: All levels

Fee: FREE

Spots are limited, so call the Rabun County Library at 706-782-3731 to sign up! 
Please note, this workshop is for Rabun County residents only.


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JUNE 16 - One-Day Garment Workshop with Natalie Chanin
at the Hambidge Center

This workshop includes discussion of the physics of sewing, reverse appliqué, and an overview of garment construction and other sewing techniques. Suited to beginners and experienced sewers alike, work with Natalie to create a hand-sewn project from a selection of custom kits.

Natalie “Alabama” Chanin is the founder and creative director of Alabama Chanin. She was born and raised in Florence, Alabama, where her company is based. Natalie has a degree in Environmental Design with a focus on industrial and craft-based textiles from North Carolina State University. After graduation, Natalie worked in the junior sportswear industry on New York’s Seventh Avenue, before moving abroad. For over a decade, Natalie worked as a stylist and costume designer, traveling the globe.

Natalie returned to her Southern home in 2001 with the intention of producing a line of hand-sewn t-shirts. In the process of creating that project, she also produced a short documentary. That film, Stitch, focused on traditional quilt-making in the South, with stories told by those who stitched and were warmed by those quilts. Each “character” in the film had a unique story. Each quilt told the tale of the joys and hardships, and the friendships and family bonds of a specific time and place.

While producing the film and collection of t-shirts, Natalie met many women who were former seamstresses or textile workers from the 1980s, when her hometown’s former title was “T-Shirt Capital of the World.” The signing of NAFTA left many women and men unemployed as Alabama’s textile industry moved south of the border. This perfect storm of circumstances inspired Alabama Chanin.

Natalie strives to achieve complete sustainability at every stage of the manufacturing process - from materials and processes, to cultural sustainability in the form of preserving hand-sewing skills. Over the years, Alabama Chanin has organically expanded, establishing a family of businesses that includes the Alabama Chanin collection, The School of Making, The Factory Store + Cafe, and Building 14 Design + Manufacturing Services. In 2013, Chanin won the CFDA/Lexus Eco-Fashion Challenge, an award competition that identifies and celebrates the greatest American designers working in the realm of sustainable fashion. Natalie continues to learn and to teach craft traditions, or “living arts,” using them to bridge generational, economic, and cultural gaps.

Date:
June 16

Experience level:
All levels

Fee: $475 (includes materials, instruction, lunch, stories, and laughter)

Class size limit: 20

 Registration Deadline: June 1
 



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JUNE 23 - Elemental Pie with Lisa Donovan and Angie Mosier

at the Hambidge Center

All art is a mixture of science and emotion, no matter what the medium. There is a mystique attached to baked goods and pie in particular. Lisa Donovan and Angie Mosier are two bakers who also make their living documenting the intersection of history, culinary arts and our daily life. Baking is intimidating to many people, so the basics of pie crust, fillings and the hows and whys of baking pies will be demonstrated during this workshop. Lisa will speak to the emotional elements that take over when she is baking and how that makes its way into her writing. Angie will talk about how she uses her photography to capture the techniques but also the beauty of working hands, ingredients and the joy of cooking.

In this hands-on workshop, students will leave with a better understanding of the elements of pie-baking, from dough-making to filling, but also of the cultural and historical importance of baking in the South in regard to storytelling and passing down our histories through food – plus they’ll taste a lot of pies and make some hand-pies of their own to take home.

Additionally, Angie will give some expert tips on styling and photographing the pies, so students might want to bring a smartphone or digital camera.

Lisa Donovan is a pastry chef and James Beard award winning food writer living in Nashville, TN. As the pastry chef to two of the South’s most influential chefs, Sean Brock and Tandy Wilson, Lisa has been formative in establishing a technique driven and historically rich narrative of Southern pastry — unabashedly serving her Church Cakes and pies to finish fine dining experiences and creating a repertoire of desserts to redefine what it means to be a “Southern baker.” Lisa is currently writing and producing content for cookbooks as well as working on her own writing, both in food and in the arts. She has written for Food & Wine, Saveur, Southern Living, Garden & Gun, Local Palette and more. Lisa’s first book, a memoir through Penguin Press, is forthcoming.

Angie Mosier is a writer, photographer, stylist, and cook endeavoring to merge all of these skills in a meaningful way. By documenting food, and the folks who work to bring good food to the table, she hopes to celebrate it, save it, cook it, serve it and of course, eat it. Her culinary career began over 20 years ago when she started a wedding cake and pastry business. When her creations were photographed for books and magazines, Angie found that she loved the process of making food look good for the camera and began working as a food stylist. Telling the story of food both visually and with words is important to Angie and she now works as a freelance writer, stylist and photographer.

Her work has been seen in Food & Wine, Town and Country, The New York Times, Southern Living, Atlanta Magazine, Atlanta Homes and Lifestyles, and Garden and Gun magazines. Her essays on Southern cakes, pies and traditional meals can be read in The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. She has collaborated with cookbook and craft authors such as John T. Edge, Matt Lee and Ted Lee, Virginia Willis, Natalie Chanin, and the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Date: June 23, 2-5pm

Experience level: All levels

Fee: $60 (includes all materials needed for the workshop and a $20 non-refundable deposit)

Class Limit: 16

Registration Deadline: June 21




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JUNE 30 - T-shirt Workshop with Natalie Chanin
at the Rabun County Library in Clayton, Georgia
for Rabun County Residents only

Explore the creative process with Natalie Chanin in this hands-on, two-hour t-shirt workshop. Walk through the steps utilized in creating a one-of-a-kind t-shirt inspired by stencils, organic cotton, and hand sewing. Surface design materials and tools provided. Bring your own, or purchase an organic cotton t-shirt at the workshop. This workshop is suited to makers of all skill levels. This workshop is presented in collaboration with the Hambidge Center and the Rabun County Library, and is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Natalie “Alabama” Chanin is the founder and creative director of Alabama Chanin. She was born and raised in Florence, Alabama, where her company is based. Natalie has a degree in Environmental Design with a focus on industrial and craft-based textiles from North Carolina State University. After graduation, Natalie worked in the junior sportswear industry on New York’s Seventh Avenue, before moving abroad. For over a decade, Natalie worked as a stylist and costume designer, traveling the globe.

Natalie returned to her Southern home in 2001 with the intention of producing a line of hand-sewn t-shirts. In the process of creating that project, she also produced a short documentary. That film, Stitch, focused on traditional quilt-making in the South, with stories told by those who stitched and were warmed by those quilts. Each “character” in the film had a unique story. Each quilt told the tale of the joys and hardships, and the friendships and family bonds of a specific time and place.

While producing the film and collection of t-shirts, Natalie met many women who were former seamstresses or textile workers from the 1980s, when her hometown’s former title was “T-Shirt Capital of the World.” The signing of NAFTA left many women and men unemployed as Alabama’s textile industry moved south of the border. This perfect storm of circumstances inspired Alabama Chanin.

Natalie strives to achieve complete sustainability at every stage of the manufacturing process - from materials and processes, to cultural sustainability in the form of preserving hand-sewing skills. Over the years, Alabama Chanin has organically expanded, establishing a family of businesses that includes the Alabama Chanin collection, The School of Making, The Factory Store + Cafe, and Building 14 Design + Manufacturing Services. In 2013, Chanin won the CFDA/Lexus Eco-Fashion Challenge, an award competition that identifies and celebrates the greatest American designers working in the realm of sustainable fashion. Natalie continues to learn and to teach craft traditions, or “living arts,” using them to bridge generational, economic, and cultural gaps.

Dates:
June 30, 10am-noon

Experience level:
All levels

Fee:
FREE

Spaces are limited, so call the Rabun County Library at 706-782-3731 to sign up! 
Please note, this workshop is for Rabun County residents only.



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JULY 28 & 29 - Pinch Pot Portraits with Mike Lalone
at the Hambidge Center’s Antinori Pottery Studio

Be a champion of faces! In this hands-on workshop, learn how to compose a human portrait with simple pinch pots. This construction will be the base for a proportionally correct sculpture. Features will be added using an easy formula so that everything is properly placed. Students will be taught to carefully observe facial anatomy and turn those observations into realistic portraits using modeling techniques and texture-making methods. Once you’ve learned the system, it’s very easy to make more! Students will take home a leather-hard sculpture, suitable for future firing.

Mike Lalone started his clay career at a teacher re-certification class which led to full time teaching of ceramics for 21 years at Dr. Phillips High School in Orlando, Florida. His program grew into one of the most respected clay programs in the country. Val Cushing, Paul Soldner, Chris Staley and other ceramic greats visited his students during the time Mike was teaching there. Mike was awarded the Daniel Clark Excellence in Teaching award in New York City and various other local and state awards. His students earned many scholarships and several have gone on to teach in various schools. Mike did work at the Kansas City Art Institute and Alfred University to further his studies. Mike also has shown work and been collected in China, Japan and Europe, as well as the Florida Governor's Mansion. Mike has been active in both hand building (several sculpture commissions) and wheel work (functional ash glaze ware in galleries across the country) during his career. His love of teaching has taken him to the John C. Campbell Folk School where he is the Resident Potter.

In the image above are examples of sculptures by Mike’s workshop students.

Dates:
July 28 & 29, 9am-4pm

Experience Level:
All levels, but suitable for beginners, ages 16 & up

Fee: $145 (includes $20 materials fee, 2 vegetarian lunches prepared by the Hambidge chef, and a $50 non-refundable deposit)

Class size limit: 10

Registration Deadline: July 20




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AUGUST 4 & 5 - Inside Out & Upside Down: Mold-Making with Rachel K. Garceau
at the Hambidge Center’s Antinori Pottery Studio

Mold-made objects can seem almost magical. Depending on your desired result, molds can produce objects that conceal or emulate the ‘evidence of the hand,’ but in either case the technique often mystifies viewers. Molds can be used to make one-off sculptures of a chosen medium, or they can be used again and again to create a series of multiples.

Join Rachel K. Garceau for Inside Out & Upside Down, a hands-on workshop where you’ll learn to make plaster molds with a focus on using them for slip-casting ceramics, with a discussion of how to use them with other materials, such as plaster and paper pulp.

Every participant will complete at least one working mold which they can use when they return home. Students will leave with the skills to continue to make molds, as well as the information that they need to use their molds. The workshop will include an exploration of ways to remain mindful of the body in your studio practice, and how this consciousness can impact your focus and ability to solve problems.

Rachel K. Garceau is a studio artist living and working in the Atlanta, GA area, and has been recognized as a 2015 Emerging Artist by the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts and one of 2017’s Women to Watch by the Georgia Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She utilizes slip-cast porcelain forms to construct site-responsive installations. Her work is often born from a curiosity about an object or a place and a desire to come to a deeper understanding of it. Rachel received a BA in Fine Arts from Franklin Pierce College in 2003 and went on to pursue her education through studio assistantships, workshops, and residencies. In 2013, Rachel completed the two-year Core Fellowship at Penland School of Crafts (NC). She has received residencies at Vendsyssel Kuntsmuseum (DK), Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts (TN), Haystack Mountain School of Crafts (ME) and the Hambidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences (GA). Her work has been shown at GreenHill Center for NC Art (NC), Lillstreet Gallery (IL), and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia (GA), and has been published in Studio Potter, Ceramics Monthly, and NCECA Journal, and also appears in CAST: Art and Objects Made Using Humanity’s Most Transformational Process.

The images above are examples of Rachel’s mold-made sculptures.

Dates:
August 4 & 5, 9am-5pm

Experience Level:
All levels

Fee: $280 (includes $50 lab fee, 2 vegetarian lunches prepared by the Hambidge chef, and a $100 non-refundable deposit)

Class size limit: 8

Registration Deadline: July 31

 This workshop is SOLD OUT! Sign up here for the waiting list in case we get a cancellation.


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SEPTEMBER 8 & 9 - Natural/Native Plant Dye Workshop with Coulter Fussell
at the Hambidge Center

Students will learn the basic chemistry and formulas behind natural dying and will learn to recognize native plants that may yield color. Weather permitting and depending on what plants are ready the weekend of the workshop, we will forage plants from the woods and fields at the Hambidge Center. This could include sumac, black walnut, tickseed, and/or goldenrod. Students will leave the workshop with a few yards of various fabrics, each with color yielded from whatever plants we find.

Coulter Fussell was born and raised in Columbus, Georgia. As the daughter of a museum curator and a prolific quilter, Coulter combines strict traditional quilting techniques with the freeing abandon of contemporary painting methods. Coulter draws inspiration for her work from the natural world. Her naturally dyed textiles utilize native plants that she forages from the woods and fields around her.

Coulter is the owner of YaloRun Textiles, a vintage fabric store and experimental textile studio in Water Valley, Mississippi where she lives with her two young sons.


Dates:
September 8 & 9, starting at 10am

Experience Level:
All levels, all ages

Fee: $150 (includes chef-prepared vegetarian lunches for both days, a $40 materials fee, and a $50 non-refundable deposit)

Class size limit: 16

Registration Deadline: August 31